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STS-What & Why:

What is STS?

Results of STS

Need for STS

Design of STS

Impact of STS

Origin of STS

Spread of STS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STS-What & Why:

What is STS?

Results of STS

Need for STS

Design of STS

Impact of STS

Origin of STS

Spread of STS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STS-What & Why:

What is STS?

Results of STS

Need for STS

Design of STS

Impact of STS

Origin of STS

Spread of STS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STS-What & Why:

What is STS?

Results of STS

Need for STS

Design of STS

Impact of STS

Origin of STS

Spread of STS

Bible Story Telling and Purposeful Questions Encourage Non-Literates and Literates to Discover.

In September 2006, Simply The Story (STS) was born. The leaders of The God’s Story Project developed this training of trainers program.

Built on the foundation of “storying,” STS added the dynamic of training storytellers to dig deeply into a Bible story and to discover spiritual truths for themselves.

Another major distinctive of STS is thatIMG_9965_Africa_Discussion we train people of all socio-economic, cultural and educational backgrounds to teach others through discussion.

Literate and non-literate STS practitioners know how to tell accurate Bible stories in an interesting manner.

They also know how to form wise, gentle questions that allow others to discover spiritual truth and personal applications for themselves.

To see the latent abilities of non-literates surface as they use critical thinking skills to discover and lead others is a joy to behold.

Hemet_for_Web3_DiscussionThe touching testimonies of highly literate people, even ones in ministry, encourage all of the STS instructors.

A missionary to South America told us after an STS workshop, “For 38 years, my husband has tried to get me to teach the ladies, but I said ‘No, I cannot teach.’

But I found out here with STS that I can tell stories and I can talk about them. I will now teach!”



“Look At My Eyes”

Interestingly, if you want to share a Bible story in an informal setting, maybe even with a stranger, you could ask, "May I read you a story?" Or you might ask, “May I tell you a story?”
  • Which approach is more personal?
  • Which approach requires material to be in hand?
  • Which shows that the story has a personal meaning to you?
  • Which approach has the least risk of strangers not listening because it may not be coming from their holy book?
  • Which approach keeps the ongoing interchange most personal?

We teach a natural conversational witnessing style in STS. After learning how to use stories this way, we provide opportunity to practice them, first in a safe workshop environment and then in “practicals” outside of the workshop.

We encourage and guide people in the skill of listening well as they converse with people in the marketplace of life. We show how, when you sense that a portion of a Bible story would fit with the conversation, to say something such as, "That reminds me of a story."

At this point in a conversation, if you then began to read to people out of the Bible, actions would be gone, expressions, at best, would be subdued, and eye contact would be nonexistent. However, none of those ways people connect with one another are lost when you look at someone and tell them a story from the Bible. Once again, that is a value gained from learning stories and housing them in your “heart pocket.” You are ready and able to tell stories face to face with people.

The wife of a mission leader told us that she was called upon to speak at a village named Hetuada in Nepal. “I told an STS interactive-style Bible story. The women told me later that they thought they would just be ‘spoken’ to, but were amazed that they were asked to participate.

“One older woman went home and told stories that she had learned to her grandson. She later reported back to us that her grandson said, ‘I love it when you look at my eyes and tell me a story and do not read it.’”



They Remembered, But It Was Unexpected!

Last summer, I had a couple of neighbor boys over. Out in our driveway, I told them the Bible story, "Jesus Stills the Storm." I told it, not read it, and told it with motions and voice intonations. These boys were 7 and 8 years old.

Several days later, I had the same boys over. They were sitting on the couch. I asked them to close their eyes and then I read "Jesus Calls Andrew and Simon" to them from Mark 1. This story is about 1/3rd the length of "Jesus Stills the Storm" and much simpler. I then asked the boys to tell back the story that I had just read them. They told back "Jesus Stills the Storm!"

Rick. CO, USA

[Both stories had been heard by the boys. One would think that the shorter story just read to them (which was the story the reader asked them to retell) would be the story told back. But instead a story the boys heard two days earlier—a story that was told with expressions, and seen with actions—was what the boys remembered. The method of Scripture presentation made the difference.]



Through workshops, audio training, oral Bible schools, radio storytelling and extension course classes, we empower people to evangelize and disciple in a natural oral style.

On this site, and particularly on the sub links from this page, you will see explanations of the need for STS, its description, results and origin, and how STS methods fit biblical and oral strategy.

Wonderfully, many Christian denominations and ministries are discovering this need for oral strategies. This discovery involves recognizing the vital importance of using whole Bible stories to reach oral learners.

We thank you for investigating STS. Each group using story has specific goals and distinctives. We encourage you to look into some of the other methods of learning and delivering Bible stories to find out what best suits your needs and call.