Non-Literate Print

 

 

Training Info:

Workshops:

  Hosting
__Non-Literate
___ Critical Thinking
  Practicals
  Challenges
  Locations

Oral Schools

Practitioner Audio

Certify Leaders

After A Workshop

Multiplication
Strategies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Training Info:

Workshops:
__Hosting
__Non-Literate
___ Critical Thinking
---Practicals
---Challenges
__Locations

Oral Schools

Practitoner Audio

Certify Leaders

After A Workshop

Multiplication
Strategies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Training Info:

Workshops:
__Hosting
__Non-Literate
___ Critical Thinking
---Practicals
---Challenges
__Locations

Oral Schools

Practitoner Audio

Certify Leaders

After A Workshop

Multiplication
Strategies

Workshops and Non-Literates

Where Do Non-Literates Fit in STS Training?

Although much is said inDSC02064_Non-Literates missions and in the current move to embrace and to communicate with oral learners, some divides still exist that slow that move.

One very big issue is the perception people have on the link of literacy to spirituality:

Let us ask ourselves.

Do we think that:

  • Semi or non-literate people have the ability to think critically?
  • Semi or non-literate people can discover deep spiritual truths in Scripture?
  • It is possible for semi or non-literate people to impart deep spiritual truths to literate learners?

Some would answer “No” to those three questions. Others may say “Yes,” but in practice they live as if the answers are “No.” In STS we say “Yes” to all three and pray that in our trainings and ministry practices that we live out our “Yeses.”

Those three questions need to be addressed by everyone, both literate and non–literate. Often, how those questions are answered dictates people’s positions in ministry and how much they are used within the working Body of Christ. Most importantly, how people feel about themselves and these issues greatly colors their own perceptions of their abilities and usefulness.

We have observed and have come to believe from scripture that God created all people with the ability to think critically. (The term “critical” is used here not in the sense of negative judgment, but as looking at the most important issues in a clear objective manner.)

For instance, Adam and Eve had their opportunity to think critically in the Garden; the Lord God had given them all of the information needed to discern and make wise choices. But they chose not to use that God-given ability.

Throughout the Bible, God is asking people, even imploring them, to seek wisdom. We see that wisdom God offers, that discernment, as much the same thing as critical thinking.

Is God’s offer to give wisdom only offered to the literate? “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.” James 1:6

We in STS believe everyone can think critically, and when that ability is recognized as existent, and is nurtured, that God-given ability can grow. In STS trainings the nurturing of critical thinking that takes place enables anyone who seeks wisdom (literate or non-literate) to be able to find that wisdom—critical thinking, resurrected.

Testimonies such as these below that show non-literates discovering deep spiritual discoveries comes to us often. When this discovering occurs, it is hard to decide who is the most surprised, the literates who did not expect those uneducated people to find deep truth or the non-literates who had no idea God would speak to them! For a one example of how non-literate people were reached see Now That I Know the Stories.

See an in-depth article on Critical Thinking, and our few comments and questions on the possible biblical connection.



Indigenous Become Critical Thinkers

STS, Same For Tribals
Ah! One might say, "This way of 'inductive Bible study oral style' is really for the highly educated and ministry leaders. After all, didn't you say that a PhD is teaching Simply The Story at US Center For World Missions?"

Yes...True. It is for the highly educated and yes, it is for the leaders. But.....can less educated people learn Simply The Story?

You judge ... After landing in Peru, a husband & wife and three teenage daughters from Ireland flew to a remote city. Then ... they traveled for 36 hours by boat up the Amazon to the very remote village of Ollanta. How remote? The children have sloths and anacondas for pets (as the one daughter in the photo illustrates.)

This family led a workshop for nine Urarina Indians and 28 Mestizos, some who walked five days to come to the training! These Indians live in raised stilt houses and sleep in hammocks. 

YWAM workers reached these people with the Gospel and now disciple them. It is slow tedious work to teach these rural Peruvians to read and to study topical Bible lessons.

The family from Ireland taught them Bible stories. How to teach using the stories and how to lead others to discovery through discussion proved to be a brand new concept to everyone. The Christian leaders marveled as they watched these traditionally stoic Urarina Indians come alive! Everyone in attendance told the Bible stories, enacted lively dramas and clearly understood the deep doctrines in the stories.

Amazingly, the same training schedule used to train in the USA was used in Peru! Simply The Story centers on the Bible and believes that God's Word is sufficient for all. From stilt houses to high rise condos, we see that those who listen...will hear.


Panama: She Did it!
“Another thing that amazed me among the indigenous people was that they quickly went from a place of not being used to critical thinking to forming great questions of observation and application.

"Initially I thought it would be an uphill climb and a real battle, but it turned out really well, learning to not only think for themselves beyond, 'What observations do we see in this story?' type questions to asking incisive key-word questions.

"Everyone thought that this one lady, a non-literate, was not going to present a story at all as she hardly spoke Spanish and was in the category of non-literate. She slept through a lot of the up-front class - something seen as "normal" for women from the indigenous peoples!

"I encouraged the tribe leader to see if she would do the presentation in Spanish in full first and not let her know that there were two back up options (1: doing it in her tribal language and 2: doing story-only). He and the rest of the tribe were bowled over when the woman said she would do "it all" in Spanish! She did it and with only a little tribal language thrown in with translation for clarification purposes.

"One Ngabe man said it had given him the tools he needed to share the Gospel with his people.

"One indigenous tribesman from Chiriqui said that he felt this was the missing element in reaching the youth and others in his village. He had been trying (in vain) to reach the youth with discipleship books and now he understood why it didn't work and why he must use story from now on.

"Another tribesman is going back armed with a way to reach his non-literate kinsmen and to start a YWAM base in their province (San Blas) and he wants STS to come there so he can properly train his people."


For more information on non-literates see Beyond Expectations, Modern Day Leaping